Weekend Adventures in Nebaj

Weekend Fun
Some may wonder what I do with my free time and weekends here in small town Nebaj. Before I arrived, I imagined there would be plenty of quiet time to read, write, and sleep. Two and a half months later I’ve read maybe 10 pages, written just 3 short blog posts and slept late maybe twice. Believe it or not, I socialize more here than I did in New York. Somehow there is always something going on. It’s probably because we have a small community of friends and the small town makes it easier to meet up on the spur of the moment. It helps that everything is so much cheaper here – a full meal complete with drinks and dessert at Popi’s runs about $5.

Our weekends generally involve gathering people together for hiking, cooking or dancing, or as is often the case, all of the above. I’ve been learning how to cook with the local veggies: acelga, bleda, chipilin, and leaves of huisquil among others that are basically varieties of chard or spinach or mustard greens.

I was very surprised to learn there is also a basketball league in Nebaj. It’s not my favorite sport but I enjoy playing just about anything and it’s yet another way to socialize. My team is probably the favorite to win it all and I’m trying to contribute by being the Dennis Rodman of Guatemala – grabbing every rebound and blocking every shot. If you’ve never seen me, you might read that sentence and assume I’m at least 6’5″ (196 cm). But while I am taller than all but 4 or 5 people in the league, I’m only 5’9″ (175 cm). Finally I get to see how tall people feel.

Hikes

One of the main attractions of living in this area for me was the hiking. So I was very excited when I heard a group of 16 was heading to Chichel Falls one of my first Saturdays here. We first caught a micro (van) to Chajul then had to hike up and down dirt paths for 2 hours. A drunk guy accompanied us for most of the way. He wanted to be our guide and was even somehow leading the pack. A couple of times he lost energy and slowed down or even stopped but a few minutes later he’d be running up ahead again. It was impressive and I think he only eventually broke off from the group because he saw a bar nearby. Actually I don’t know why he left but he entertained us for a while and I think there are far worse things a drunk can do than “lead” a hike. Unfortunately there are quite a few guys like him that are serious alcoholics and just seem to be drinking at all times of day. They are referred to as “bolos”. The community frowns on drinking generally but as with most bad habits or addictions, repression or blaming is rarely helpful. Finding other enjoyable but healthier habits could help, and changing daily circumstances that trigger the habits also helps. But it’s an uphill battle. I saw a great TED talk on the subject of addiction arguing that it is mostly driven by lack of social connection: http://www.ted.com/talks/johann_hari_everything_you_think_you_know_about_addiction_is_wrong

That aside, after several uphill battles of our own, we finally reached the waterfall and jumped into the pool at the bottom to cool off. The falls were much taller than I expected and, along with the swimming, well worth the journey.

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Acul Cheese Farm is another attraction nearby. An Italian family moved to the village of Acul years ago and started producing some incredible cheese. Great motivation to spend an hour climbing the hills to get there. Apart from the farm the village is tiny with hardly anything else going on.

A few weeks later we had a respite from the rains that the Ixil region is famous for and we headed for the outlying aldea (village) of Cocop – this was an easy hike but still had pretty mountainside views along the way. We had lunch in a random lady’s house. Ok, maybe she wasn’t completely random but she has an unofficial unmarked diner right as you get into the village. I wondered who else frequents her establishment. After lunch we returned by a different route that took us to Rio Azul where we dipped our feet a little before getting to the road to hitch on a pickup truck.

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There is also plenty going on here that doesn’t require as much sweating. I’ve learned to play Settlers of Catan which I’m starting to get addicted to, we’ve had a few group dinners with various foods from around the world, and I’ve started practicing guitar again. I hope to always be learning and socializing no matter how old I get.

A Note on Water and Power

Water and electricity are things we generally take for granted in the richer countries. Here I’ve quickly had to adjust my expectations of these basic utilities.

In the mornings after 7 until the early afternoons, the water pressure is almost always very low or it’s not running at all. The electricity is often low in the evenings around 8pm which scared me at first because I thought my laptop just couldn’t hold a charge anymore. The issue with water is it lacks presure when everyone is using it early in the day. With the power the issue is not enough supply to meet demand in the evenings when everyone has their lights and possibly appliances on.

So it’s important to time your daily routines around those shortages as much as possible. It can be inconvenient but it may not be such a bad thing if it reduces usage and waste of resources.

Sometimes water goes out for longer. Twice in the first 3 weeks power went out for almost 3 days each time. Normally it goes out here and there but comes back within a day. I’m getting used to it though. What I am not yet used to is the loudspeakers of the at least 10 political parties fighting to gain votes for September elections. More on that in the next post.

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